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Equivalence of generic immunosuppressants

There are no compelling pharmacological arguments against the sensible use of the generic immunosuppressants ciclosporin, tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in clinical practice, argue pharmacologists working in drug evaluation in The Netherlands [1].

Alleviating concerns around generic antiepileptic medications

Reports that some patients with epilepsy were more likely to experience seizures and hospitalisation after switching from brand-name drugs to generic alternatives have led to concerns about generic antiepilepsy drugs (AEDs). A recent review, however, argues that the onset of seizures following a switch may be due more to the disruption of normal routine than the choice of medication. The authors suggest that AEDs are relatively safe and effective compared to innovator drugs.

Switching between generics of anti-epileptic drugs

Two different generic versions of anti-epilepsy medicine lamotrigine have been shown to be bioequivalent in patients with epilepsy and to not cause any differences in seizure frequency or adverse events, according to a study published in the February 2016 online edition of The Lancet Neurology.

Perceptions of the substitution of generics

Pharmacists are mostly positive about the substitution of generics for brand-name drugs, according to a study analysing negative perceptions about generics, carried out by researchers from New Zealand and the US [1].

Perceptions of the safety and side effects of generics

A quarter of doctors believe that generics are less safe and cause more side effects than brand-name drugs, according to a study carried out by researchers from New Zealand and the US [1].

Perceptions of the effectiveness and quality of generics

More than a quarter of doctors and the general public believe that generics are less effective and of poorer quality than brand-name drugs, according to a study carried out by researchers from New Zealand and the US [1].

Generics perceptions in patients, pharmacists and doctors

A significant proportion of the general public, pharmacists and doctors have negative perceptions about generics, according to a study carried out by researchers from New Zealand and the US [1].

Perception and knowledge of generics in Portugal

Patients in Portugal are misinformed about generics, according to researchers from the Bragança Polytechnic Institute [1].

Measures to increase generics use in Greece

Austerity has forced Greece to introduce a number of measures to reduce the amount it spends on healthcare. But how have measures aimed at increasing generics use in the country been perceived by stakeholders? This was a question Karampali and co-authors from the National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece tried to answer [1].

Consumer choice between generic and brand-name medicines in a small generics market

Background
Generics offer an opportunity to governments to contain pharmaceutical expenditures, as they are generally 10‒80% lower in price than the originator brand-name medicines. Belgium has a small generics market, which takes up 15% of the total pharmaceutical market (in packages sold).

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