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Position statement on approval of biosimilars in Latin America

The Fifth Latin American Forum on Biosimilars (FLAB) was held in Brasilia, Brazil in 2015 with the theme of ‘Interchangeability and Automatic Substitution’.  Discussions centred on the approval of CT-P13, an infliximab biosimilar; and RTXM83, a proposed rituximab biosimilar, in both Brazil and Argentina. Following these discussions, Babini et al. [1] published a FLAB position statement on the approval of these monoclonal antibody biosimilars in the context of current regulations in these two Latin American countries.

Improvement in uptake of biosimilars in Spain

Author Ainhoa Aranguren Oyarzábal and colleagues from the Madrid Health Service (MHS), Spain found that there has been an increase in the uptake of biosimilars in Spain since indicators were introduced [1].

Uptake of biosimilars increasing in Spain

Use of biosimilars in Madrid, Spain, has increased after approaches were introduced to try and improve uptake of biosimilars in the country, according to Ainhoa Aranguren Oyarzábal and colleagues from the Madrid Health Service (MHS), Spain [1].

Approaches to increase uptake of biosimilars in Spain

Ainhoa Aranguren Oyarzábal and colleagues from the Madrid Health Service (MHS), Spain, describe approaches that have been introduced in Spain to try and improve uptake of biosimilars in the country [1].

A strategic approach to increase uptake of biosimilars in Spain

Ainhoa Aranguren Oyarzábal and colleagues from the Madrid Health Service (MHS), Spain, describe the strategic approach that has been introduced in Spain to try and improve uptake of biosimilars in the country [1].

Improving uptake of biosimilars in Spain

Ainhoa Aranguren Oyarzábal and colleagues from the Madrid Health Service (MHS), Spain, investigated how efforts to improve the uptake of biosimilars in the country have been working.

Assessing the immunogenicity of monoclonal antibodies

Safety is a major concern when it comes to biologicals (including biosimilars) and the most critical safety concern is immunogenicity. This is especially important in monoclonal antibody (mAb) biologicals, which are large molecules with complex structures and functions and which represent the largest class of biologicals [1].

Sharing biosimilars substitution information with patients critical

On 12 October 2013, California Governor Jerry Brown vetoed legislation known as SB 598. Some believed this bill would have impeded access to biosimilars, but others believe it would have supported and strengthened patient-provider communication [1].

More immunogenicity data needed for biosimilar mAbs

Eight therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) will lose EU and US patent protection before 2020, making way for a new class of biosimilar. The promise of biosimilar mAbs is enticing, but these are more complex molecules than current biosimilars and it is unclear how their similarity with originator mAbs will be tested.

The future of biosimilar mAbs in Europe

Biosimilars – products that are similar to originator biological medicinal products – have had a positive impact on healthcare systems. But it takes up to four years following market approval before biosimilars are accepted by the clinical community and by the people holding the purse strings. Now, a new class of biosimilar –monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) – is set to challenge the system further, writes Professor Andrea Laslop of the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety [1].